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How to use the verb nizil / نزل in Spoken Levantine Arabic

This is the 3rd post in a series about the different ways you can use the most common verbs in Spoken Lebanese Arabic so that you can make the most out of all the Arabic you learn. See the other posts here.

“nizil” is a verb that you will use all of the time and in many different ways. In general it can be defined as to go down, but, as you will see below, the meaning of the verb really depends on the context of the sentence…

Some of the different ways to use nizil

I often go down* to Beirut these days, in order to look for a job.

ها الإيام عم بنزل كتير على بيروت عشان فتّش ع شغل

The weather is really nice, we will get in the sea.

لأنّه الطقس كتير حلو، قرّرنا ننزل ع البحر.

We’re going* downtown to shop for tonight’s party.

نازلين ع السوق نجيب كم غرض لحفلة المسا

When we went to Cairo, we stayed in a hotel with affordable prices

لمّا سافرنا ع القاهرة نزلنا بأوتيل أسعارُه مقبولة

I don’t like to take the lift, I’ll take the stairs (down)

ما بحبّ إنزل بالأسونسور، رح إنزل ع الدّرج

A new movie has been released and we want to see it.

نزل فيلم جديد بالسينما وعبالنا نحضرُه.

I want to get out of the bus!

بدّي إنزَل من الباص!

The US dollar (currency) is real low these days!

الدولار نازل منيح هاالإيام!!

My salary is being transferred to my bank account at the end of each month.

كل آخر شهر معاشي عم ينزل بالحساب

Get down from the ladder, you’re going to fall down!

نزال بسرعة عن السّلُّم !!! أحسن ما توقع

The plane landed an hour ago.

الطيارة نزلت من ساعة

When a new fashion is released, prices are high then they start to go down

دايماً لمّا بتنزل موضة جديدة بتكون أسعارها غالية وشوي شوي بتبلّش الأسعار تنزل.

Come down here, I need you.

نزال لعندي لتحت معاوزك

*you might have noticed that nizil is frequently used by native speakers to mean to go (instead of raa7). Here the idea of using this is because you typically go down from your apartment into the crowd or go down from your village to Beirut, for example.

And here is how it is conjugated…

In our Verbs Dictionary in Levantine Colloquial Arabic (for sale at ALPS Beirut or online here) we find the verb and see that it is tagged with an A meaning it is an essential verb to learn and use first, what it means, its form and how it is conjugated in the present and past tenses.

Want to get better at using verbs? Our small class sizes or private tutoring are perfect for that. Tell us what you are looking for:

 

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Easter Greetings and Traditions in Lebanon

It’s one of two holy weeks for Easter in Lebanon.  Easter is a big deal in Lebanon and, depending on the neighborhood, you can feel the جو in the streets the entire week leading up to Easter Sunday. Offices and schools are typically closed on Friday and Monday for both the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Easters – which this year are a week apart.

ALPS will be closed on Friday the 30th of March, Monday the 2nd and Monday the 9th of April. At this occasion, ALPS wishes every one a Happy Easter!

Christ is Risen, He is indeed.

In Arabic: المسيح قام، حقًّا قام

Some people would also choose to say: فُصح مَجيد  for happy Easter.

Easter is a time for many traditions in the Levant: painted eggs are offered to family and guests as well as the famous “ma3muul”, مَعمول ; an oriental pastry based on wheat paste and… butter! It’s stuffed with smashed pistachios – فِستُق حلبي, or with ground nuts جوز , or else with ground dates, تمر , and covered with white ground sugar. It’s a must to try!

Another tradition, on Holy Thursday, is to visit seven churches during the afternoon, as a pilgrimage. The mass celebrated on Holy Thursday also marks the commemoration of the feet washing during which the priest repeats the gesture of Jesus who lowered himself to wash the feet of his disciples.  This ancient ritual takes its roots in Jerusalem, Palestine, with the birth of Christianity when the believers met every year on the night of Holy Thursday to do the same. It would be: for French readers, please go to https://fr.aleteia.org/2016/03/25/pourquoi-visitons-nous-sept-eglises-le-jeudi-saint-2

Then Friday is typically a time to fast, pray, grieve for Jesus death and on Sunday families go to church and then share a meal together to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus.  All churches stay open for these occasions, even in remote villages.

Do you want an Arabic program that is focused on you and helping you actually speak with people and navigate the culture and customs? If so, contact us below and we’ll help you get into a plan that is made especially for you.

ALPS Beirut Holiday Schedule

ينعاد عليكن

Merry Christmas from Alps Beirut!

Our last day of class at the Hamra branch is Friday December 22nd and we will reopen on January 2nd at 8:00 AM for private tutoring. Also our weekly free conversation sessions will start back on the 2nd. Then group classes begin on January 8th. 

Here’s how to say Merry Christmas and Happy New Years in Spoken Lebanese!

 

How to use the verb طُلع in Spoken Levantine Arabic

This is the second post in a new series about the different ways you can use the most common verbs in Spoken Lebanese Arabic so that you can make the most out of learning this verb. See the other posts here.

“Toli3” is a verb that is fun to use and hard to define because it’s meaning is based on the preposition that comes after it.  That’s why mastering this one verb can help you easily say different types of things like it turns out, how much does it cost, and I’m going up on the elevator. Check out the table below to see how the use and meaning of the verb changes based on the preposition that is used with it.

Some of the different ways to use Toli3

I went up on the stairs طلُعت ع الدّرج
I went out of the car طلُعت من السيارة
I overtook him/ I stopped thinking of him (depends on the context) طلُعت عنُّه
We all got in the car طلعنا كلنا بالسيارة
He accelerated, he sprinted طُلع طلعة غير شكل
I bought it new, it turned out broken شتريتها جديدة، طُلعت مكسورة
I felt like having an ice cream [lit. it rose to my mind to have an ice cream] طلع ع بالي آكل بوظة
She made me mad [lit. my temper rose against her] طُلع خلقي عليها

And here is how it is conjugated…

طُلِع in the past and بيُطلَع in the present.

In our Verbs Dictionary in Levantine Colloquial Arabic (for sale at ALPS Beirut or online here) we find the verb and see that it is tagged with an A meaning it is an essential verb to learn and user first, what it means, its form and how it is conjugated.

Screen Shot 2017-12-07 at 10.08.24 PM

Want to get better at using verbs? Our small class sizes or private tutoring are perfect for that. Tell us what you are looking for:

Free conversation sessions each Tuesday at ALPS Beirut in Hamra

Are you looking for an opportunity to speak Lebanese? In addition to our small, personal classes and private tutoring that give ample opportunity to speak in class, make sure to stop by ALPS Beirut on Tuesdays for a cup of coffee and conversation with our Arabic teachers and other Arabic learners. Bring any questions you have about the language, culture and what to do and see in Lebanon and feel free to invite a friend.

When?

Every Tuesday from 2:00 – 4:00 PM starting November 13th, 2017 through January 30, 2018 (except for Tuesday December 26th.

Where?

ALPS Beirut is in Hamra near the American University Hospital. Here are the directions: https://alpsbeirut.wordpress.com/2011/07/21/how-do-i-get-to-alps/

Do you have to be a student at ALPS Beirut?
No🙂

What if I don’t know how to Speak Lebanese?
This time is for people who are already conversational in Arabic.
If you are just beginning, check out our classes for beginners and then join us later on.

Is it really free?
Yes completely free!

For more info contact us at alps@abtslebanon.org or by phone 961-1-75 50 25 and ask for Joelle (ALPS Director)

How to use the verb صار in Spoken Levantine Arabic

This is the first post in a new series about the different ways you can use the most common verbs in Spoken Lebanese Arabic so that you can make the most out of learning this verb. See the other posts here.

“Saar” means to happen. However, the meaning can vary according to the word or the preposition that precedes or follows the verb. Also, depending on the contextual words in the sentence, “ Saar” can also mean to become.

Some of the different ways to use Saar..

What happened?

شو  صار؟

What’s happening?

شو  عم  يصير؟

What’s going to happen?

شو  رح  يصير؟

What happened to you?

شو  صَرلَك/ شو  صَرلِك/ شو  صَرلكن؟

How long have you been in Beirut?

قدّيش  صرلَك  بِبيروت؟

How long have you been teaching?

قدّيش  صرلِك  بِتعلّمي؟

How long have you been married?

قدّيش  صرلكن  مجَوزين؟

She started to laugh.

صارت  تضحك.

They started to speak Arabic.

صاروا  يحكو  عربي.

His hair turned all white (became all white).

شَعرُه  صار كلُّه  أبيض.

She is now (she became) important in the company.

صارت  مهمّة  بالشّركة.

Did you see the different ways the meaning changed?

  • When “Saar” is preceded by “2addeish” and followed by a “L” + personal pronoun, it means, “For how long have you (I, we, he, she, they…) been…” Note that the medial long vowel alef disappears in this case.
  • If followed directly by a verb, “Saar” it means to start (an activity)
  • If followed by an adjective, “Saar” means  to become

And here is how it is conjugated…

صار in the past and بصير in the present.

Because the long vowel in the middle changes if the verb is in past or present tense we can tell that it is an irregular verb in the medial weak form. In our Verbs Dictionary in Levantine Colloquial Arabic (for sale at ALPS Beirut or online here) we find the verb and notice that it is Form IC and irregular.

Then in this table we see how Form IC irregular verbs are conjugated in the imperative, present and past tenses. The example verb for Form IC uses the verb jeib (to bring) which conjugates the same way as Saar and serves as a pattern for all verbs of form IC.


Want to get better at using verbs? Our small class sizes or private tutoring are perfect for that. Tell us what you are looking for:

Taking Bus 4 in Beirut – to and from ALPS Beirut

For many students coming to classes at ALPS Beirut, taking Bus 4 is the easiest and cheapest way to get to Hamra. Bus Fours are usually 12 person mini vans with a “4” in the window. Like this:
And no matter where you get on or off on the cost is the same 1000 Lebanese Lira ($ .66).
Where does Bus 4 go?
The route for Bus 4 starts in Dahiyye at the Lebanese University and goes right in front of our building in Hamra before it loops back and ends where it began at the Lebanese University. Check out the map with the Bus 4 route and the other busses in Beirut.  Below are a few landmarks Bus 4 passes by and if you are staying walking distance of any of these then Bus 4 could be a good option for you to get to Hamra.
  • Beirut Mall
  • Tayoune Roundabout
  • Barbir
  • Beshara al Khoury – close to Sodeco
  • Near the “Big Blue Mosque” Downtown
When you see a Bus 4  just wave it down and here are a few etiquette tips when on a bus in Beirut:
  • Greet the driver and let him know where you’d like to get off.
  • If possible, sit towards the front if you are getting off soon
  • If the driver invites you to sit next to him feel free to do so and use the chance to practice you Arabic. If you are a man and there is an open seat next to another man greet him and take that seat. You can sit next to someone of the opposite sex if there are no other options.
  • Say “3moul ma3rouf” (meaning something like if you please or do me a favor) when you want to stop and that will let the driver know when to pull over
  • It’s preferred to pay when your get off with a 1000 LL bill or a small bill

Where in Hamra is Alps?

Here’s that answer: https://alpsbeirut.wordpress.com/2011/07/21/how-do-i-get-to-alps/